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Northeast Laboratories, Inc.

Services/Testing Areas
Alcoholic Beverages
Asbestos
Biodegradation
Cleaners, Detergents and
Related Products

Composting
Compressed Air
Cosmetics
Disinfectants
Environmental
Food and Dairy Products
Hazardous Waste
Indoor Air Quality
Microbiology
Medical Device
Mold Studies
Nutraceuticals
Particle Sizing
Pharmaceutical
Plastic and Paper Goods
Potable Water

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Locations
Berlin Office
129 Mill Street, Suite 11
Berlin, CT 06037
CT 860.828.9787 or 800.826.0105
outside CT 800.654.1230
fax 860.829.1050
Contact the Berlin Office

E. coli. Contamination

Northeast Laboratories, Inc has over 30 years experience testing foods for pathogens. If you are concerned about E. coli. or other microbiological contamination of food, contact our experts.

We provide testing and on site consultation. Contact us if you require swab testing of production lines or processing areas.

More information on E. coli


Escherichia coli O157:H7 is a leading cause of food borne illness. Based on a 1999 estimate, 73,000 cases of infection and 61 deaths occur in the United States each year. In the ten CDC Food borne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet) sites (which represent 15% of the US population), there was a 29% decline in E. coli O157:H7 infection since 1996-98.

Infection with E. coli often leads to bloody diarrhea, and occasionally to kidney failure. People can become infected with E. coli O157:H7 in a variety of ways. Though most illness has been associated with eating undercooked, contaminated ground beef, people have also become ill from eating contaminated bean sprouts or fresh leafy vegetables such as lettuce and spinach. Person-to-person contact in families and child care centers is also a known mode of transmission. In addition, infection can occur after drinking raw milk and after swimming in or drinking sewage-contaminated water.

Consumers can prevent E. coli O157:H7 infection by thoroughly cooking ground beef, avoiding un-pasteurized milk, and by washing hands carefully before preparing or eating food. Fruits and vegetables should be washed well, but washing may not remove all contamination. Public service announcements on television, radio, or in the newspapers will advise you which foods to avoid in the event of an outbreak.

Because the organism lives in the intestines of healthy cattle, preventive measures on cattle farms, during meat processing, and during the growth, harvest and processing of produce are being investigated.